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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    37

    Smile SSD and TTD Benefits

    How does social security disability and TTD benefits work ? Can you go on SSD if your TTD benefits are cut off? I am still waiting for a trial date, My aa has been doing the depositions and it seems that this is taking some time to get done. I still have no ttd benefits now for going on the 3rd month. It is hard but I am not giving up the fight. I was hurt due to someone else's neglect and I am not giving up my case against them! Thanks to this board, we the IW have some where we can go to talk to others who have walked in our shoes. Thanks to all of you for being here.
    hurting

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Calif
    Posts
    18,018

    Default Re: SSD and TTD Benefits

    There is a lot of discussion on this board regarding your question.
    The process is defined here http://www.allsup.com/about-ssdi/ssdi-process.aspx

    What you shold know now though is SSDI is not for short term, or interim payments while you wait for your claim to resolve, or a settlement is reached and paid out.

    SSDI is long term, 100% disabled..under SSA rules. Much more difficult to qualify for than WC TTD.

    The application process could take longer than the comp claim is now, and chances are you'll be released to RTW before you'd receive the first check from SSA/SSDI.

    Here is an explanation of Social Security's five-step process to determine if an individual qualifies for SSDI Benefits:

    1. Determine if an individual is "working (engaging in substantial gainful activity)" according to the SSA definition. Earning more than $980 a month as an employee is enough to be disqualified from receiving Social Security disability benefits.
    2. Conclude the disability must be severe enough to significantly limit one's ability to perform basic work activities needed to do most jobs. For example:

    Walking, standing, sitting, lifting, pushing, pulling, reaching, carrying or handling
    Seeing, hearing and speaking
    Understanding/carrying out and remembering simple instructions
    Responding appropriately to supervision, co-workers and usual work situations
    Dealing with changes in a routine work setting
    3. Ask if the disability meets or equals a medical listing.

    4. Explore the ability of an individual to perform work he has done in the past despite his disability. If the SSA finds that a person can do his past work, benefits are denied. If the person cannot, then the process proceeds to the fifth and final step.

    5. Review age, education, work experience and physical/mental condition to determine what other work, if any, the person can perform. To determine disability, the SSA enlists medical-vocational rules, which vary according to age.
    http://www.allsup.com/about-ssdi/ssd...uidelines.aspx
    SSA has a list... http://www.ssas.com/connect/index.htmlSocial Security Ruling 96-9p:
    The 137 Unskilled Sedentary Occupations
    If you can perform any of these 137 unskilled jobs, it would be difficult for SSA to find you totally 'disabled' under their rules. Believe it or not... being an 'escort' is one of the jobs listed.
    (though probably not in the context we might be thinking )

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