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  1. #1
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    Dec 2017
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    Default Trying to Rewrite W.c.laws

    My workers compensation claim was made in the State of: New York I was hurt at work injuring by back and neck.it happen in 1994. I cried in pain for 2yrs until found a Dr. Who literally saved my life.surgery was not an option.this Dr put me on oxycontin and oxycodone.i was able to function enough to feel like I had a purpose.long story short,bc the B's with opiod and herion,they want to punish people on RX.i have a hearing to go to this month.the W.C. lawyer I have,if I didn't know better. I think she's working on their behalf.they want to wein me off RX.i tried to get off RX 5yrs ago on my own.when I went half way down to what I was taking,it felt like I did when first got hurt.Anyone gone through this? Can they just STOP the RX,the only thing helping me live close to normal life?? Any input would be appreciated
    Last edited by Iamfbch; 12-08-2017 at 05:03 PM. Reason: Didn't write reason

  2. #2
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    Oct 1971
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    5,138

    Default Re: Trying to Rewrite W.c.laws

    Iamfbch
    Can they just STOP the RX,the only thing helping me live close to normal life??
    Reality Check - Let's start by admitting you're addicted, hopefully the courts will order an intervention and save your life.
    There isn't a pill made that enables someone to "live close to normal life" - if there was, we'd all be on it.

    You can't stay on opioids for life, they'll destroy your liver - you'll have to ween off at some point.
    I'm surprised they let you stay on as long as they have, you're lucky to still be alive and have a liver (if you do)
    Pain killers aren't "life savers" there's nothing in them that sustains vital functions - they where never intended for long term use unless you have a terminal condition.

    It's normal to feel pain when you ween off opioids, you've desensitized yourself to pain, any pain - they could fillet you and you wouldn't feel it.
    That's why it seems the pain is as bad as when you started when you come off the drugs, this feeling will quickly sub side after a few weeks.
    I've lost close friends and family due to opioid addiction, it's nothing to play with.
    Get help if you can't ween off on your own, you'll be surprised at how much better you'll feel in the long run.

    Like that old song says "I'm so glad I got my own, so glad that I can see - my life's a natural high"
    Keep Up The Fight!!



    Tony
    Moderator Responses are based on my personal bias, experience and research - They do not represent the views of the admin nor may be accepted in the legal community, always consult an attorney.

  3. #3
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    Dec 2017
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    Default Re: Trying to Rewrite W.c.laws

    Pretty much you need to be medical weaned off the opioids, and then get into an outpatient program, NA, AA whatever is your choice and they are free. What we have learned about opioids is that they are frightening and do nothing to alleviate pain and are killing at least 60 people every day. These people do not die of overdoses they are using their medications as directed. Get clean and stay clean!

  4. #4
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    Oct 1971
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    Default Re: Trying to Rewrite W.c.laws

    Wilcke
    What we have learned about opioids is that they are frightening and do nothing to alleviate pain and are killing at least 60 people every day.
    First off, who's "we"
    Secondly the idea that opioids "do nothing to alleviate pain" is laughable, you've obviously never suffered trauma or experienced real pain.
    Because pain is subjective, I would expect there to be little if any objective evidence to support the fact that pain killers work - that doesn't mean they "do nothing to alleviate pain"

    If you're ever subjected to real pain, I guarantee you will beg for an opioid, they work very well.
    They do however lose effect over time, which requires higher doses that can lead to addiction and liver damage.
    This is why they're not intended for long term use unless you have a terminal condition.

    These people do not die of overdoses they are using their medications as directed.
    Then they're dying from the condition they're taking the medications for or not taking them as prescribed, not specifically from the opioids.
    People on opioids are monitored closely with urine tests - at the first sign of liver damage or other problems the drug is stopped immediately.
    I've never heard of anyone dying from taking opioids as directed, where did you get that from?

    This is the exact type of mania that's causing people in real pain, problems with getting the needed medicine - there needs to be a balance of opinions based on facts.
    Many people die from chemotherapy, should they ban that treatment for cancer?

    Doctors Concerned About Pain Medication Overdose Deaths Require Drug Tests
    https://drugfree.org/learn/drug-and-...re-drug-tests/

    Tony
    Moderator Responses are based on my personal bias, experience and research - They do not represent the views of the admin nor may be accepted in the legal community, always consult an attorney.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    831 East Morehead St., Ste 355, Charlotte, NC 28202
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    Default Re: Trying to Rewrite W.c.laws

    I won a case on Dec. 19 at the NC Court of Appeals for the widow of a client who was killed by his opiate meds that he took for chronic pain from his workers' comp injury. His actual mechanism of death was chronic "OIC"--opioid induced constipation, which caused a large bowel obstruction, which caused bowel necrosis. In other words, the tissue of his colon died. He took his drugs as directed. Constipation is the most common side effect of these drugs.

    There is more than one way for these drugs to kill you.
    The North Carolina Court of Appeals has held that "In contested Workers' Compensation cases today, access to competent legal counsel is a virtual necessity." Church v. Baxter Travenol Labs, Inc., and American Motorists Insurance Company, 104 N.C. App. 411, 416 (1991).

    Bob Bollinger, Attorney and Board Certified Specialist in NC Workers' Compensation Law

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Trying to Rewrite W.c.laws

    Quote Quoting complwyr View Post
    I won a case on Dec. 19 at the NC Court of Appeals for the widow of a client who was killed by his opiate meds that he took for chronic pain from his workers' comp injury. His actual mechanism of death was chronic "OIC"--opioid induced constipation, which caused a large bowel obstruction, which caused bowel necrosis. In other words, the tissue of his colon died. He took his drugs as directed. Constipation is the most common side effect of these drugs.

    There is more than one way for these drugs to kill you.
    OIC is not a fatal condition, complications can easily be prevented with early treatment.
    This patient wasn't "killed by his opiate meds that he took for chronic pain" He died from ignoring complications and failing to report them - that can happen with any drug, even an aspirin.

    OIC is a very common complication from opioids - most patients report the problem, take additional meds to treat the condition and enjoy a full recovery.
    I know for a fact doctors warn patients about possible complications and warn them to stop taking the drug and call if they experience them - so technically, your client wasn't following doctors orders (not taking as prescribed.)

    Dying from OIC was a slow, painful death, this patient had to be addicted if he didn't stop taking the drug and call his doctor - they have medications for this condition, he didn't have to die.
    Of course this is if the doctor followed protocol, otherwise that doctor should be held responsible.
    Another case of opioids getting a bad rap from doctor incompetence or patient neglect.

    Treatment for OIC
    Although opioids are very effective for treating and managing pain, their use frequently results in opioid-induced constipation (OIC). Treatment options for OIC may be as simple as changing diet or as complicated as requiring several medicines and laxatives.
    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/inf...nstipation.php

    Tony
    Moderator Responses are based on my personal bias, experience and research - They do not represent the views of the admin nor may be accepted in the legal community, always consult an attorney.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    831 East Morehead St., Ste 355, Charlotte, NC 28202
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    Default Re: Trying to Rewrite W.c.laws

    My client was not neglectful-- he was being seen regularly by a pain management doc and by other doctors, was taking his pain meds as prescribed, and was getting Relistor injections for the chronic OIC. He went to the ER when his mental state became a bit altered and his abdominal pain increased. He was diagnosed then with bowel blockage and had surgery, but the surgery was too late to save his life. A bowel blockage can dilate the intestine and when that happens, the blood flow to the tissue is impaired, and that causes necrosis of the tissue, leading to death of that organ. Google "toxic mega colon." But his problem all started with chronic OIC (opiates cause gastroparesis, which contributes to the issue) and the ultimately fatal condition developed from there, with the gastroparesis being a significant contributing factor.

    Interestingly, when I deposed the pain management doctor who was prescribing the pain meds, he denied that the guy had been complaining of chronic constipation, even though he had written the script for the Relistor, which is only used to combat OIC. And the surgeon showed up for his depo with his medical malpractice defense lawyer alongside him, even though the surgeon was the least culpable doctor in the whole scenario.
    Last edited by complwyr; 12-30-2017 at 12:21 PM.
    The North Carolina Court of Appeals has held that "In contested Workers' Compensation cases today, access to competent legal counsel is a virtual necessity." Church v. Baxter Travenol Labs, Inc., and American Motorists Insurance Company, 104 N.C. App. 411, 416 (1991).

    Bob Bollinger, Attorney and Board Certified Specialist in NC Workers' Compensation Law

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Trying to Rewrite W.c.laws

    This is one of those freak cases, it's not the norm - It's a stretch to claim "a client was killed by his opiate meds that he took for chronic pain" - he died from delayed or improper treatment of OIC.

    At the end of the day, someone screwed up in treating the OIC either by waiting too late for treatment or not treating properly.
    This is a very common condition and is treated daily with positive results - this is the first I've heard of someone dying from it.
    I wouldn't say it's something that people should worry about and I sure can't say "opioids killed him"

    Treatment of Opioid-Induced Constipation: The Hard Facts
    Opioids and Constipation: It Happens
    You probably already know that opioid use is accompanied by many side effects like sedation, nausea, and tolerance. One of the most common and troubling side effects is constipation; 40% to 80% of patients taking opioids may suffer from this side effect.

    Symptoms of Opioid-Induced Constipation
    Opioid-induced constipation can affect adherence to a pain-relieving medication regimen. In fact, in a survey from Bell and colleages (2017) of over 300 patients taking daily opioids for chronic pain, about 30 percent of patients missed, decreased or stopped opioid use to ease their bowel movements.
    Frequent symptoms might include:
    Difficulty passing stools
    Hard, dry or infrequent (< 3 perweek) bowel movements
    Pain during bowel movement
    Straining, incomplete evacuation of stool
    Bloating or distention in the stomach

    How to Treat Opioid-Induced Constipation?
    Prevention of OIC is always preferred over waiting to treat it due to the possibility of complications from unaddressed constipation. For example, changing diet, increasing fluids, adding dietary fiber, stool softeners, or other laxatives -- along with opioids -- to help prevent constipation from opioids is a common and accepted practice.
    However, when OIC does occur, the basic principals of treating opioid-induced constipation are similar to the methods used to handle most other opioid side effects:
    Lower the opioid dose, which may not always be possible dependent upon pain levels
    Manage the side effect(s) with other medications or lifestyle changes
    Change the opioid to a different class of pain medication that is less constipating
    https://www.drugs.com/slideshow/trea...rd-facts-1283#

    Tony
    Moderator Responses are based on my personal bias, experience and research - They do not represent the views of the admin nor may be accepted in the legal community, always consult an attorney.

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