Dexter
Life changing money when you are on SSDI and the great thing is SSDI cannot count the money as income since it is considered state disability money. Non-income.
They don't count it as income, they consider it a benefit and reduce (offset your payments accordingly)
If you receive workers’ compensation or other public disability benefits, AND SSDI benefits, the total amount of these benefits cannot exceed 80% of your average current earnings before you became disabled.

How Workers’ Compensation and Other Disability Payments May Affect Your Benefits
Workers’ compensation and other public disability benefits, however, may reduce your SSDI benefits.
Workers’ compensation payments are made to a worker because of a job-related injury or illness. They may be paid by federal or state workers’
compensation agencies, employers, or by insurance companies on behalf of employers.
Other public disability payments may affect your Social Security benefits. These payments are made by a federal, state, or local government and are for disabling medical conditions that are not job-related. Examples are civil service disability benefits, state temporary disability benefits, and state or local government retirement benefits that are based on disability.

If you receive workers’ compensation or other public disability benefits, AND SSDI benefits, the total amount of these benefits cannot exceed 80% of your average current earnings before you became disabled.
If the total amount of these benefits exceeds 80% of your average current earnings, the excess amount is deducted from your Social Security benefit.
https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10018.pdf

Also there's another issue - if these settlements didn't include medical treatment for life (which is highly unlikely, it defeats the purpose of settling a claim)
Medicare won't pay for medical associated with a work related injury unless the claimant protects Medicare's interest.
Medicare requires an attestment from the patient when seeking medical treatment as to whether this injury is work related or from an accident - if you lie, they can charge you with fraud.

The claimant would have to submit a Workers’ Compensation Medicare Set Aside Arrangement if the total settlement amount is greater than $25,000.00; or
The claimant has a reasonable expectation of Medicare enrollment within 30 months of the settlement date and the anticipated total settlement amount for future medical expenses and disability/lost wages over the life or duration of the settlement agreement is expected to be greater than $250,000.00
https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coordin...WCMSA-Overview

You didn't respond to my point about how you can claim wage loss benefits when the employer offers work within your restrictions and you refuse to work. by resigning.

Tony